Glossary

GLOSSARY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Dy

Dying declaration:

A dying declaration is the evidence provided by a person who is no his death bed and are given the same weight age as regular evidence. The reason behind this is that a person who is dying and know it generally will not tell a lie.

Dynamic asset allocation:

Dynamic asset allocation also known as guaranteed linked notes is an investment strategy where the investment is exposed to a range of investment without putting the principal at risk.

Dynamic hedging:

Used widely by derivatives dealers dynamic hedging involves a portfolio investment techniques through which a hedge is adjusted as per the changes in the value and position of the underlying assets options futures or forward contract.

Dynasty trust:

A trust wherein it is designed in a way to pass down for many generations in order to avoid tax.

Dystopia:

The opposite of utopia a society in which condition are characterized by human misery deprivation squalor disease etc the term is said to have been coined by John Stuart mill in 1868 in a UK house of commons speech criticizing government Irish land policy.

The daily official list:

The daily record settings out the prices of shares that are traded on a stock exchange.




In this post we are giving the words starts with dy and its meanings. People can improve their knowledge by go through this.

Everyone wants to learn something on their daily life. Building your vocabulary is one of the easiest ways to improve the power of your writing and make any writing task that much easier, as you will have several synonyms in your repertoire to pull from every time. Developing your vocabulary need not be difficult or painful. Here are 25 ways you can improve your writing vocabulary every day. Use New Words Use a word immediately after you learn it. Try to make a game out of using a new word as soon as you learn it. Every day, try to slip in a new word into the conversation, a journal entry, an assignment or an email to a friend. Do this as often as possible, and repeat the word to yourself.

Read Every Day

Once you’re out of school, word drills and assigned reading become things of the past. While these were tools for building your vocabulary repertoire while you were young, it doesn’t mean you should abandon reading. Try to read a well-written and edited essay, magazine article, book or news article every day. Nonfiction and technical books will quickly teach you new ways to think and speak with words you may be unfamiliar with, but any type of reading will help you along.

Learn Roots

Learn the roots of words. Most words in the English language are built from a common root, prefix, and suffix, usually with an origin in the Greek or Latin language. Once you learn a root, you’ll begin to understand more words that use the same root. For example, -duc- (Latin root word) means to lead or to make, such as in the words produce or deduce.

Use a Thesaurus

Keep a thesaurus handy. As you write, keep a thesaurus handy and use it when you find yourself using a word too often, or using a word that you know doesn’t quite convey the right meaning. This will help you better express yourself, and you’ll also learn a new word in the process.

Develop Practical Vocabulary

This means you should start by learning words that express what’s important to you for the task at hand. A good example of this is learning trade language or words you use often in a hobby or vocation. Rather than immediately turning to cliches or jargon that’s tossed around, look for clearer words to express to peers what you’re writing about


. Learn New Words Every Day

To improve your vocabulary quickly, make an effort to learn at least one new word every single day. There are plenty of ways to do this, such as a Word of the Day calendar or email list, or simply picking a word from a thesaurus or dictionary.

Look up Words You Don’t Know

How often do you come across words that are unfamiliar as you read? Don’t just gloss over them; take the time to look them up, and if you don’t have the time right then, write them down and look them up later.

Keep a Journal

Journaling won’t just help you develop your writing style, it will also help you improve your vocabulary. Try to use new or interesting words you’ve learned recently into a journal entry for the day or the week.

Identify Empty Words

You’re probably familiar with empty words in your speech (such as “uh” or “um”), but your writing probably has empty words as well. Look for these empty words in your writing that do not offer any substance to your reader and replace them with something more appropriate. The same principle applies to phrases and sentences, so make sure that you haven’t used six or seven phrases to say something that could be better communicated in one sentence filled with carefully-chosen words.

Diversify Your Reading List

If you tend to read the same sort of things day in and day out, you may not be exposing yourself to a wide enough range of vocabulary. Diversify the topics you read to include natural science, Shakespeare, contemporary literature, politics, history, philosophy or any other topics you think you may enjoy.


Do Word Puzzles


Word puzzles in the newspaper or a magazine aren’t just a fun way to fill time, they’re also perfect for boosting your working vocabulary. Crossword puzzles are a challenge that get your brain working hard to search your memory for words you do know but don’t use, and this can help you move words from your memory banks into your working set of vocabulary which will come across in your writing.

Related posts

GLOSSARY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Words starts with Cu

lucky

GLOSSARY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Major Topics and Its Meanings Used In Business

lucky

GLOSSARY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – Words starts with Cy

lucky

Leave a Comment